Accommodating science

The participants--all free of cataracts or other eye diseases--had vision prescriptions ranging from nearsightedness (myopia) to farsightedness (hyperopia).

The various measures of eye structure were analyzed for association with age, refraction (vision prescription), and accommodation (the ability to focus on distant or near objects by changing the shape of the lens of the eye).

The lenses are given to people whose lenses have lost their ability to reshape.

The presence of myopia, or nearsightedness, significantly affects the muscles used in focusing the lens of the eye -- a finding with important implications for the development of 'accommodating' implanted intraocular lenses (IOLs) that can adjust to different visual distances, reports a new study.

The presence of myopia, or nearsightedness, significantly affects the muscles used in focusing the lens of the eye--a finding with important implications for the development of "accommodating" implanted intraocular lenses (IOLs) that can adjust to different visual distances, reports a study in the January issue of Differences in the diameter of the ciliary muscles used to focus at different distances may have important implications for providing patients with a "customized" IOL fit.

Susana Marcos, professor of research at the Institute of Optics (CSIC), says the long-term goal for correcting presbyopia is to replace the crystalline lens with another lens that can restore the function of reshaping.

Scientists are now working on developing new lenses that can reshape themselves.

687

Leave a Reply